TAT Chat: So it begins. Rosé all Day.

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Rosé all Day. Light pink. Medium pink. Dark pink. It’s sweet. It’s dry. It can even be sparkling. It’s a saying people love. What are you drinking tonight? Rosé all day, the response. I went to a local wine shop and tried this Rosé – Rosé all Day! Hey, my favorite bottle shop is doing a charity fundraiser. The theme – Rosé all Day!

Be it by skin contact, saignée or blending, Rosé all Day. Grenache, Sangiovese, Syrah, Pinor Noir or Carignan – Rosé all Day!

There’s no shame in drinking pink. Have some sass. Noobs and wine snobs around the world have embraced the pink. You should too. Rosé all Day! Avoid the gallon jugs of pink drink, better yet, avoid any jug wine completely. Embrace the pink. Men … don’t be afraid to stand tall and swirl that pink drink. Light pink. Dark pink. It doesn’t matter. Sniff. Swirl. Sip. At that event ceremony or at that fancy restaurant. Women will love you embracing your feminine side with that glass of pink in your hand.

I’m learning to embrace the pink. You might say I’m coming out of my pink closet. Swirl and savor the pink at home in all its glory. Outside on the front porch swing. On the back deck with a burger in hand – Rosé all Day. Home alone on a Friday night, whatever shall I do? Embrace the pink. Pop open a bottle of Rosé that’s resting in the freezer. Just the right temperature now. Rosé all Day!

To kick off our own personal Rosé all Day – well, not really personal, if we’re sharing it with all you on your cell phones or at home – Jen took me to Durham where a local wine shop was hosting its own Rosé all Day festival.

It was pink. Pink cups. Pink flowers. A pink flamingo. Bubbly Art spelled out in pink balloons under a bucket of pink sparkling drinks available for purchase. It was a melting pot of people who want to embrace their inner pink. Pink coffee mugs for the first 60 people. We were early. My pink mug will be displayed at work.

Groups of girls out for a girl’s afternoon of drinking pink. Men out with their girlfriends and spouses, humdrum looks on their faces, probably not wanting to embrace pink. Other men embrace the pink, sporting pink shirts to show off their wardrobe of coral, fuchsia and salmon. A gay couple having a blast from station to station embracing the pink liquid.

As we were early to the event, we looked over the list of wines while the dumping of ice to our left and right made their way into buckets to keep the pink chilled for the afternoon. Counting the wine reps. 1 rep, 2 rep, 3 rep, more. Counting more. 4 rep, 5 rep, 6 rep. There is no more.

Pink from France. Pink from Spain. South Africa, Argentina and Italy. It appeared the home of the Grand Old Flag got the shaft, with only 1 wine representing where we call home. One solo wine from Lodi, California. Such a shame that the U.S. produces many nice pink drinks – but no one was willing to let them shine.

Stick around boys and girls. Ladies, gentleman and everything in between. It’s time to get your pink on. A total of 31 different rosé wines could be sampled, if you are up to the challenge. Some might have been. I humbly bowed out at around 21 wines. Anything more than that of the same wine style and you are just doing your tongue a disservice. Now you are just drinking to get drunk. You have no inclination to purchase.

Eddie started us off with a Venturini Baldini Lambrusco from Italy. But after that we were off to the races. Reminiscent to the Kentucky Derby, I felt I was Maximum Security, and all my drinks – all 6 wines at Eddie’s station – needed to be consumed in under two minutes. Pour. Pour. Pour. Pour. Pour. Pour. Move on to your next location. Eddie rushed us through his tasting reminiscent to what those big-box wineries tend to do here in our state.

It’s hard to take notes when you are rushed. The taste of the Lambrusco was still fresh in my mouth as I was already finishing up with the Domaine Fenouillet from France. More pink attire making its way inside the store. Embrace the Pink. Rosé all Day!

Patrick was our next stop. With only three wines at his station, we were able to pace out the wines. No horse race here. After two wines from Mendoza, we sampled the lone California wine from Klinker Brick. Primarily known for their old vine Zinfandel wines, it came as a shock to find out they used a different kind of grape for its rosé.

More pink. More noise. Rosé all Day! At one point I was expecting to see Christian Pink, of course, a play on Christian Grey, make an entrance and tie me up to the PVC tree in the corner of the room and force pink drink down my gullet with a pink funnel. Don’t worry. I’ll treat you gentle. You haven’t completely embraced the pink, he says to me.

Lines start to become longer. More people wanting their pink drink. It’s no longer educational. It’s now arms extending to their full extent – cups surrounding the face of each rep pouring the pink. 1 arm. 2 arm. 3 arms. More! Just give me pink. Rosé all Day! Rosé all Day! Feed me Seymour!

Dry. Sparkling. Sweet. It doesn’t even matter anymore. If I extend my arm, magically my cup will be filled. Feed me Seymour.

Ryan, according to our tasting sheet is pouring a pink Vinho Verde. That’s sounds interesting. But first we started with his Rezabel Txakoli from Spain. And then it was a Domaine Blanc et Fils from France. Then the Vinho Verde – one gets that same refreshment you get with a normal Vinho, but now in pink. Green, but Pink … all Day?

Roughly into the teens of pink drink, it was time to take a break. I lean against the wall and scratch my shoulders up on the corner. It’s dawned on me. This crowd is getting too big. Rosé all Day has brought them out of the woodworks. A lot of tasting going on starboard – if we were a ship we’d slowly start to capsize. From the distance I see that same – arms stretched out towards the wine reps. Over heads. Between bodies. Squeeze through. Twist and turn. 1 arm. 2 arms. Too many to count. I hear it again. Feed me Seymour.

We made our way to Matt. After a quick huddle, we decided he’d be our last. The sound was becoming unbearable. Crowds aren’t my cup of tea. Loud shrieks. Pretentious drinkers. Drinkers who don’t care about education and just want to drink. All of that made me want to end my drinking session early. After our last of 4 wines, a DeMorgenzon from South Africa, it was time to bid adieu.

It was pink. It was Rosé all Day. Well, it was Rosé for 70 minutes. I got my share of the pink drink.  I enjoyed some. I didn’t others. But with so many people and the growing sounds of jumbled voices blended into one giant mass of indistinct clutter – it was time to go. It was going to be too difficult to select my favorite to purchase. But that’s OK – Jen and I are doing our own Rosé festival at home. No sounds other than the sounds of our two cats as we enjoy our own Rosé all Day – and we plan on sharing with you.

Rosé wine. Rosé beer. Rosé cider. In a glass. In a can. We’ll share with you the education you can’t get at a “festival.” We’ll chat color and styles. We’ll chat California Rosé and yes, even North Carolina Rosé. We’ll post more than a daily Instagram post to showcase the world of Pink. What does that really get you? Absolutely nothing. Do you want me to say it again? Sure, you’ll see us on Instagram, but we’ll also share real educational notes and good, old fashion creative writing to keep you on your toes.

So follow our adventures. Grab the pink by the horns and tag along for our adventure. And if I haven’t said this enough … let’s say it again for good measures. Let us all … Rosé. All. Day!

– Dathan Kazsuk